Petrie's Infamous Core #7

Ian Lawton
posted 10-25-1999 07:21

Chris

Many thanks for constructiveness of last reply - now I think we are getting somewhere, at least on the machining front.

The major point I would once again like to emphasise, because I think we may still be clouding it, is the following: I have always understood that you allow for the fact that any rotational effect in the drill cores may be down to the feeding rather than the cutting mechanism, but surely my point still stands that any rotational striations caused by a "feed-not-cut" mechanism cannot be used to judge the basic speed of cut - and I still maintain that it was this very possibility which appeared to excite both Petrie and yourself in the first place. It is in this sense I have dubbed it a red herring, but if I am being unfair please elucidate further.

Also, with ref to the quartz layers being cut deeper than the feldsapr, may I remind you of Harry Brownlee's comments as quoted in "Giza: The Truth" (p. 219): he argues that "when a diamond or corundum-tipped tubular drill meets a region of quartz which is embedded in the softer feldspar, some of the quartz may be ripped out, depending upon the crystal's orientation and grain direction with respect to the tool angle". Any comments on this as an explanation?

 

Chris Dunn
posted 10-04-1999 20:54

Ian Lawton
posted 10-19-1999 00:06

Chris Dunn
posted 10-23-1999 17:06

Ian Lawton
posted 10-25-1999 07:21

Chris Dunn
posted 10-25-1999 20:24

Ian Lawton By email to Chris Dunn 12/6/99

Chris Dunn Response12/9/99

Chris Dunn Visit to Petrie Museum Part One - Posted 12/12/1999

Chris Dunn Visit to Petrie Museum Part Two - Posted 12/12/1999

Chris Dunn Visit to Petrie Museum Part Three - Posted 12/12/1999

Text and Photographs Copyright 1999 Christopher Dunn
Drill core #7 (UC 16036) Copyright 1999 The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology
University College London.

With Kind Thanks to the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, London.